Help & Info

uprisingconcept2About Uprising

bombproofBombproof Holds

textureHold Types & Themes

textureBuilding a Wall

textureFAQ

About Uprising

Uprising is a climbing company based in Christchurch, New Zealand. It was set in 2008 up by Sefton Priestley, a climbing instructor, coach and 2x NZ Sportclimbing Champion. Operations Manager Stu Kurth, A is a notorious local boulder crusher, having established and repeated many of the hardest problems in New Zealand. On any given day they are probably either making climbing holds, or bouldering at Flock Hill.

Bombproof Holds

What’s all the fuss about?

Most climbing holds are made with with polyester resin – this is the cheapest option out there but often produces brittle holds. These easily chip around the edges and can break if dropped, slightly overtightened, put on a not-perfectly flat surface or generally looked at the wrong way.

Some overseas companies are now using types of polyurethane resins – some still have a tendency to chip, others flex when you pull on the jugs – and all are expensive.

Not happy with the products already available, we took matters into our own hands. After 6 months of testing, mixing and remixing we have come up with the next step in climbing hold material design: Bombproof.

Bombproof Urethane

The composite we have developed is vastly superior to any hold material we have used. For instance a standard polyester hold dropped from shoulder height onto concrete has a fair chance of chipping or, worse, developing a fracture which may cause it to shatter when used on the wall. This is bad enough on a home bouldering cave, but on a commercial wall a falling sharp-edged broken hold is a serious hazard.
We recently took one of our test holds, threw it a full tilt against a concrete wall multiple times, smashed it repeatedly with a hammer then ran over it a few times for good measure. It hardly had a scuff mark on it, so we put it in the boulder room of the local gym where it is used every day – and the texture is still perfect!

So how much extra is it going to cost?

Nothing – we are offering you these cutting edge climbing holds at our regular low prices.

Hold Types & Themes

To help you find the best holds for your wall, we have organised our holds into different types, or uses, and different themes or detailing.

Hold Types:

Depending on their size and how easy they are to hold, different holds are better in different situations:

DETAIL-HOLD1HANDJUGJugs 1-Hand
Jugs are holds that offer a incut aspect making them easy to grip. Our jugs have a subtle texture and a high edge radius making them comfortable to hold and helping to prevent the chance of injury. 1-Hand jugs are great on beginner’s and kids walls as they are cheap and fun to use. Also they are great for moderate warm-ups on overhanging training walls.
DETAIL-HOLD2HANDJUGJugs 2-Hand
These are jugs so big and incut that they you can get two hands on them, and offer a positive holding area even on extremely overhanging terrain. Very young climbers may find some of these shapes a bit too big for their hand size.
DETAIL-HOLDTECHTechnical Shapes
These are shapes which are great for intermediate-advanced climbers as handholds, or for interesting footholds. Often they offer only a flat edge or even a sloping surface to hold, requiring a bit of thinking (and finger strength!)
DETAIL-HOLDPOCKETPockets
Holds which simulate the holes sometimes found in real rock, where you can often only get a couple of fingers in. This requires precision and control, and they are often technically challenging to use as footholds as only the tips of your toes can be used.
DETAIL-HOLDXLExtra Large Holds
These shapes are really big, and sold individually. The larger ones are so big that you can even bolt other holds onto them, making them extensions to your wall. Holds like these bring your wall into 3 dimensions, making possible movements which otherwise couldn’t be simulated on flat panels.
DETAIL-HOLDMODULATIONModulation
The Organic Modulation series sprouted in 2011 and have been popping up all over the world. These are 8 shapes which can be combined to make crazy growths which crawl their way up your wall. They also have inset t-nuts in the ends for bolting on regular holds.

Hold Themes:

Each hold has detailing which make them more than just your average blobs. Sets are organised by these themes, so you can choose holds which look and function similarly.

DETAIL-DUALTEXDual-Tex
Dual-Tex holds have a mixture of our classic subtle texture and rougher rock-like surfaces. This allows for engaging climbing that is usually found only outdoors. The most positive part of the hold is often not immediately obvious. These holds are perfect for people training with outdoor rock climbing goals in mind.
DETAIL-DREMPLES
Dremples
These holds have little “dremple” mini-pockets inspired by the way water interacts with the limestone of our local bouldering paradise, the Castle Hill basin. These are usually found on the sides and underneath the main usable part, making for tricky holds when they are put on upside-down, or for great thumb-catches if they are sideways.
DETAIL-RESISTANCE
Resistance
These holds are sculpted with subtle edges and facets making them great training holds. Anglular without being sharp, these evoke the flat pad crimps found on the sportclimbs of the Blue Mountains in New South Wales.
DETAIL-REBELLION
Rebellion
Concave surfaces and thin pinches are the hallmarks of this theme. A great complimentary hold type to the blocky and convex Resistance shapes. Really unique holds that are sure to motivate.
DETAIL-BUBBLE
Bubbles
The bubbles which grow over these holds make for positive thumb holds when they are on overhangs, and give options for the feet when the holds are underclings.
Plus they look cool.

Building a Wall

This section of the website is dedicated to giving you a bit of insight into the process of setting up a climbing wall, including a few simple but effective designs.

Our holds are used all around the world and there is a huge variety of safety standards, rules and regulations between countries and regions. This guide could never cover a fraction of these so make sure you consult with or use a qualified builder or engineer to make sure that your wall is safe and legal! Climbing of any kind is inherently dangerous – be safe and remember this is just an overview article, not a complete wall manufacturing manual in the slightest.

 

Who will use it?

First of all, who is this wall going to be used by? Most non-commercial walls tend to be either a wall made for younger or novice climbers, a wall ostensibly made for the kids but also secretly for the adults, or a training wall for regular climbers.

The Novice/Kid’s Wall

These walls are usually vertical or less-than-vertical and are made as a simple, cost effective and fun way to keep kids active. Often they are attached directly onto the side of an existing structure and can be made very quickly and with a minimum of expense. These walls are often designed as “traverse” walls where the aim is to climb side to side instead of vertically, minimizing potential fall height.

The Half-and-Half Wall

A wall which can be fun for the kids but still provide a challenge for adults should have a variety of angles and hold sizes, with some vertical sections as well as slight overhangs. A wall which steepens from a vertical start could be a good idea.

The Home Woodie

For climbers wanting the ability to have access to a great workout at home the home woodie is the way to go. Usually incorporating angles between 10 and 45 degrees overhanging, these walls are most commonly built into a spare room, shed or garage. Even a slight overhang is preferable to a vertical wall, which will limit the effectiveness of the wall for training.

 

Wood or concrete?

Most climbing walls are constructed from strong plywood attached to a wooden frame. This gives the advantage of being able to fit t-nuts into the back of the ply, so the holds can be moved around quickly and easily. You can attach holds directly to a concrete wall, but the fasteners needed (called drop-in anchors) tend to be a fair bit more expensive than t-nuts. The screw-on holds can be attached with masonry screws but they need predrilling.

 

Where will it go?

Vertical or slightly off-vertical walls can often be attached directly to the side of an existing wall or building providing that it is strong enough to take the load of the climbing wall and potentially multiple climbers at a time. If the ground is suitable, an alternative is to cement posts and have a freestanding wall, which can be designed in a way to fit aesthetically into the existing landscape (feel free to use that phrase when trying to convince your better half to let you put a traverse wall in the back yard).

For any outdoor wall that will be exposed to the elements you are best to use treated ply and framing so your wall doesn’t rot, and stainless steel bolts to prevent rusting.

For an indoor wall, especially if you are planning on having some steeper angles, you may be able to use the interior framing of a spare room or, classically, the shed or garage. Climbers can put much more than their body weight of force on a wall so make sure the structure is strong enough to withstand the extra stress.

 

Framing

If you are planning on making a plywood wall, you will need to make a wooden frame to support it. 2”x4” (100x50mm) framing works well, with something a bit thicker at the highest stress points if it is overhanging, typically at the top and bottom of the wall. The frame can be reinforced with framing brackets to give it extra strength and rigidity. Most plywood sheets are 1.2×2.4m, so plan your wall dimensions and framing around that to minimise wastage.

 

Cladding

An industry standard is 22mm ply for commercial walls although personally I haven’t ripped t-nuts out of the wall on anything under 18mm. You might get away with 17mm for a vertical kid’s wall but I wouldn’t suggest anything under that.

If the ply is going to be exposed to the elements it needs to be treated or “marine-grade” which costs a bit extra. Have a shop around, sometimes you see excess ply for sale online or if you know a builder see if they can source some for you. Some hardware stores charge a premium price.

 

Fixings

For a kid’s wall 1-4 panels in total area, you might want to consider the HighTen Packs which include positive handholds and lots of footholds, all of which attach with woodscrews. About 1 pack per panel is a good rule of thumb to start off a wall.

If you want to be able to change your holds often then the traditional bolt-and-tnut method works well. Regardless of how many holds you start off with, get lots of t-nuts in as they are much easier to place before mounting the ply. Mark out where the framing will be on back of the ply and avoid these areas as the bolts will sometimes go beyond the back of the t-nut. Mark up (depending on the hold density you eventually want) 50-80 points at random as a grid pattern will greatly decrease the movement possibilities on your wall. Drill 12mm holes as close to perfectly perpendicular as possible and fix the t-nuts to the backside of the ply with a hammer. The first time you put a hold on a t-nut the process of tightening will seat the t-nut fully.

 

Finishing

Many people choose to leave their wall as bare plywood, although there are advantages to texturing your wall. The increased grip lets you smear on the wall anywhere making for movements more like those on rock. Also the incidence of spinning holds decreases. It tends to look better as well.

Play around with a mixture of acrylic paint with silica sand (approx 1:4 – 1:5 depending on the thickness of paint). A couple of coats should leave a rough sandpaper appearance. A primer coat before and a light sand-free coat after will help with the lifespan of the texture. If you are painting once the panels are in place you will need to plug the t-nut holes so paint doesn’t get in. 12mm wood or foam dowelling works well for this, as do cheap wooden golf tees.

 

The Landing

This is a really important consideration as a fall from even one foot off the ground can result in injury. If you are making a wall to use in a school or public place there will be guidelines as to what matting is required. If it is an outdoor wall you might be able to use pebbles, bark or sand as a landing material as long as they are of an appropriate depth. Linkable hard foam mats are available and cheap if the wall isn’t going too high. The ideal for a home woodie would be a good thickness of lower density foam topped with a layer of higher density foam, covered by pvc or canvas to avoid gaps. The cheap option is to find a bunch of second-hand mattresses and borrow your friend’s boulder mats in return for letting them train on your wall.

 

Holds

The number and type of holds you need will vary depending on the usage of the wall. 25-80 holds per plywood sheet (10-30 per square metre) would be a common range from a kid’s traverse wall to a kitted-out home training wall. See our hold types and themes section for descriptions of the different kinds of holds.

The Kids Wall

This wall is a four-panel vertical wall attached directly to an existing wall. The framing has been attached starting 100mm off the ground to preserve the wood and fasteners.

The Framing:

Kids Wall Framing

 

Plywood Cladding:

Kids Wall Bare Ply
The Completed Wall:Home2---w-painted-wall

 

The climbing wall has been given a quick coat of texture paint to fit in with the existing concrete wall. The holds could have been attached directly to the concrete with drop-in anchors and masonry screws, but this system allows quick changing of the hold positions, and may be cheaper due to the use of t-nuts instead of the more expensive drop-ins.

 

The Home Woodie

This wall has been built into a double garage leaving room for one vehicle. Instead of cladding the sides with ply the wall was left open to allow for storage behind the wall. The vertical joists have been reinforced with staggered horizontals due to the approx 4m joist length.

 

The Framing:

GW FramingPlywood Cladding:

GW Bare Ply

 

Completed Wall:

GW-2

FAQ –

Frequently Asked Questions

Wall Building

What can I attach these holds onto?
What thickness of ply do I need?
Do you build climbing walls?

Hardware

How many t-nuts do I need?
Black anodized or stainless steel?
Do I need different bolts if my ply is thicker than 22mm?
Do you sell imperial bolts and t-nuts?
I want to attach straight into a concrete wall – do you sell fasteners for this?
I need a lot of t-nuts, can you do a bulk discount?

Holds

I’m building a kids’ wall. What holds should I use?
How many holds do I need?
Are these holds ok outdoors?
One of my holds spun. What do I do?
What does “Bombproof” mean in the context of your holds?

Ordering

Do you do quotes?
Can I pick my order up to save on shipping?
How long will it take for my order to arrive?
Can you deliver them without requiring a signature?

My Account

How come my email address is visible when I post a review?

Wall Building


What can I attach these holds onto?

The most common material to make a climbing wall out of is plywood, as it is cheap and strong and by putting t-nuts in the back you can change the position of the holds quickly and easily. However you can attach them straight onto a wood fence if the slats are strong enough or they can be attached directly onto a concrete wall.

What thickness of ply do I need?
A common industry standard in NZ is 22mm ply, however this is made to take the weight of adults on extremely overhanging terrain. 17-18mm will likely be thick enough for a home training or kids’ wall.

Do you build climbing walls?
No, but happy to give advice if you need. Feel free to get in touch via our contacts page and I may be able to recommend a wall manufacturer in your area.

Hardware

How many t-nuts do I need?
If you plan on changing the position of your holds around every once in a while, aim for 50-80 t-nuts per plywood sheet (1.2 x 2.4m) or 20-30 per square metre. If you don’t plan on changing them, just buy to match your order or choose holds which attach with wood screws like the HighTen Packs.

Black anodized or stainless steel?
If you use normal black anodized bolts outside they will start to rust, and after a few years it may be difficult to undo them from the t-nuts. Less if you’re by the sea. Stainless steel bolts won’t rust – definitely a better option if you are planning to use them outside.

Do I need different bolts if my ply is thicker than 22mm?
Some of the bigger holds will need a longer bolt if you are using ply (or wood) thicker than 22mm. Your local fastener store will have 10x60mm Cap-Screw bolts, if you need lots let me know. I might be able to get a bulk discount for you.

Do you sell imperial bolts and t-nuts?
If you are asking this you are probably be in the United States and although I can supply the bolts for you, the increase in shipping fees make it much cheaper to source them yourself.

Can I use 3/8″ bolts with these holds?
Yes – the holds will take a 10mm or 3/8″ bolt.

I want to attach straight into a concrete wall – do you sell fasteners for this?
Yes I can. Let me know how many you need (through our contacts page) and if it is a hollow-block or infilled wall and I’ll let you know the price.

I need a lot of t-nuts, can you do a bulk discount?
Maybe – let me know how many you need and I’ll see what I can do.

Holds

I’m building a kids’ wall. What holds should I use?
The best holds for a kid’s wall would be single-hand jugs for the hands and some smaller holds which are cheap and good for footholds. If you plan on fixing them and only changing the position every once in a while, the HighTen sets are great as they all attach with wood screws. If you want to be able to change the holds around quickly to create new challenges, try the Jugular Packs.

How many holds do I need?
For a kid’s wall I recommend one of our HighTen or Jugular Packs per panel of ply (1.2m x 2.4m) – around 8-9 holds per square metre to give a good variety of holds. For an occasionally used home wall, 40 (14 holds/m2) holds per panel would be a density that would allow a reasonable range of problems. Most serious training walls will have a density of 80-100 holds per panel, but their hold collections are built up over the years. It’s best to get lots of t-nuts in place when you build the wall and fill the gaps over time, as t-nuts are a pain to re-fit once the panels are up.

Are these holds ok outdoors?
Uprising Bombproof resin holds are fine for outdoor use and will maintain their strength even with New Zealand’s high UV levels. Over time the lighter pigments may fade a wee bit, especially if in direct sunlight.

One of my holds spun. What do I do?
Sometimes holds do spin, especially if there is a large temperature change during the day (due to the different rates of expansion/contraction of the bolts and t-nuts), or on bare plywood walls. A couple of small woodscrews on the underside of the hold will prevent this. We are progressively retrofitting our shapes to include a fixing screw hole.

What does “Bombproof” mean in the context of your holds?
Bombproof is a climbing slang term meaning extremely safe or solid, usually applied to anchor placements. We use the term to illustrate the fact that our holds can withstand many, many times the amount of force required of them. We recently took one of our “weakest” shapes – a double hand jug with the highest lever arm, bolted it to 30mm plywood and pull tested it with a load cell. The t-nut ripped through the ply at 8kN. So we bolted it to metal and pull tested again, with the hold failing at 16kN. This is roughly equivalent to 1.6 tonnes on a single hold.

Ordering

Do you do quotes?
Sure, just send us an email through the contact page detailing what you would like, along with your contact details and we’ll send you a quote on letterhead.

Can I pick my order up to save on shipping?
Absolutely, we are based in Woolston, in Christchurch, New Zealand. Phone 021 0550 568 to organise a collection time.

How long will it take for my order to arrive?
Depending if we have your colour preference in stock or if we are pouring to order, most orders are dispatched 1-5 working days from receipt of payment. We use Fastway Couriers in NZ, usually they deliver within 2 working days. International orders will depend on the shipping method you choose with your order.

Can you deliver them without requiring a signature?
Yes, at your own risk! Put a note in the “Order Notes” section during checkout.

My Account

How come my email address is visible when I post a review?
If you go to “Edit My Profile” in the top-right corner of the screen, you can select a different name to appear when you write a review.